Timeline of photography technology

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Timeline of photography technology

The first photograph of a scene, by Niépce, 1826[1]
First photograph including a person, by Daguerre, 1838 or 1839
First color image, Maxwell, 1861
An 1877 color photo by Louis Ducos du Hauron, a French pioneer of color photography. The overlapping yellow, cyan, and red subtractive color elements can clearly be seen.
High-speed photography, Muybridge, 1878
  • 1822 – Nicéphore Niépce takes the first fixed, permanent photograph, of an engraving of Pope Pius VII, using a non-lens contact-printing "heliographic process", but it was destroyed later; the earliest surviving example is from 1825.[1]
  • 1826 – Nicéphore Niépce takes the first fixed, permanent photograph from nature,[1] a landscape that required an eight hour exposure.
  • 1835 – William Fox Talbot creates his own photography process.
  • 1839 – Louis Daguerre patents the daguerreotype.
  • 1839 – William Fox Talbot invented the positive / negative process widely used in modern photography. He refers to this as photogenic drawing.
  • 1839 – John Herschel demonstrates hyposulfite of soda (also known as hypo, or sodium thiosulfate) as a fixer, and makes the first glass negative.
  • 1851 – Introduction of the collodion process by Frederick Scott Archer.
  • 1854 – André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri credited with introduction of the carte de visite (French "visiting card"). Disdéri introduced a camera with multiple lenses, which could reproduce eight individually exposed images on a single negative. After printing on albumen paper, the images were cut apart and glued to calling card-sized mounts.
  • 1861 – The first color photograph, an additive projected image of a tartan ribbon, is shown by James Clerk Maxwell.
  • 1868 – Louis Ducos du Hauron patents a method of subtractive color photography.
  • 1871 – The gelatin emulsion is invented by Richard Maddox.
  • 1876 – F. Hurter & V. C. Driffield begin systematic evaluation of sensitivity characteristics of photographic emulsions – science of sensitometry.
  • 1878 – Eadweard Muybridge made a high-speed photographic demonstration of a moving horse, airborne during a trot, using a trip-wire system.
  • 1887 – Celluloid film base introduced.
  • 1887 – Gabriel Lippmann invents a "method of reproducing colours photographically based on the phenomenon of interference".
  • 1888 – Kodak n°1 box camera is mass marketed; first easy-to-use camera.
  • 1888 – Louis Le Prince makes Roundhay Garden Scene, considered the first film ever made.
  • 1891 – William Kennedy Laurie Dickson develops the "kinetoscopic camera" (motion pictures) while working for Thomas Edison.
  • 1895 – Auguste and Louis Lumière – Invented the cinématographe.
  • 1898 – Kodak introduced their Folding Pocket Kodak.
  • 1900 – Kodak introduced their first Brownie.
  • 1901 – Kodak introduced the 120 film.
  • 1902 – Arthur Korn devises practical telephotography technology (reduction of photographic images to signals that can be transmitted by wire to other locations); Wire-Photos in wide use in Europe by 1910, and transmitted intercontinentally by 1922.
  • 1907 – The Autochrome Lumière is the first color photography process marketed.
  • 1908 – Kinemacolor, a two-color process that is the first commercial "natural color" system for movies, is introduced.
  • 1909 – Kodak introduces a 35 mm "safety" motion picture film on an acetate base as an alternative to the highly flammable nitrate base. The motion picture industry discontinues its use after 1911 due to technical imperfections.
  • 1912 – Vest Pocket Kodak using 127 film.
  • 1912 – Kodak introduces the 22 mm amateur motion picture format, a "safety" stock on acetate base.
  • 1913 – Kodak makes 35 mm panchromatic motion picture film available on a bulk special order basis.
  • 1914 – Kodak introduced the Autographic film system.
  • 1914 – The World, the Flesh and the Devil, the first dramatic feature film in color (Kinemacolor), is released.
  • 1920s – Yasujiro Niwa invented a device for phototelegraphic transmission through cable and later via radio.
  • 1922 – Kodak makes 35 mm panchromatic motion picture film available as a regular stock.
  • 1922 – Kodak introduces 16 mm reversal film, on cellulose acetate (safety) base.
  • 1923 – Doc Harold Edgerton invents the xenon flash lamp and strobe photography.
  • 1925 – The Leica introduced the 35mm format to still photography.
  • 1926 – Kodak introduces its 35 mm Motion Picture Duplicating Film for duplicate negatives. Previously, motion picture studios used a second camera alongside the primary camera to create a duplicate negative.
  • 1932 – The first full-color movie, the cartoon Flowers and Trees, is made in Technicolor by Disney.
  • 1932 – First 8 mm amateur motion-picture film, cameras, and projectors are introduced by Kodak.
  • 1934 – The 135 film cartridge was introduced, making 35mm easy to use.
  • 1935 – Becky Sharp, the first feature film made in full color (Technicolor), is released.
  • 1936 – Introduction by IHAGEE of the Ihagee Kine Exakta 1, the first 35mm. Single Lens reflex camera.
  • 1936 – Development of Kodachrome multi-layered reversal color film.
  • 1937 – Agfacolor-Neu reversal color film.
  • 1939 – Agfacolor negative-positive color material, the first modern "print" film.
  • 1939 – The View-Master stereo viewer is introduced.
  • 1942 – Kodacolor, Kodak's first "print" film.
  • 1947 – Dennis Gabor invents holography.
  • 1947 – Edgerton develops the Rapatronic camera for the U.S. government.
  • 1948 – The Hasselblad camera was introduced.
  • 1948 – Edwin H. Land introduces the first Polaroid instant image camera.
  • 1949 – The Contax S camera was introduced, the first 35mm SLR camera with pentaprism for eye-level viewing.
  • 1952 – The 3-D film craze begins.
  • 1954 – Leica M Introduced
The first image scanned into a digital computer, 1957
  • 1957 – First Asahi Pentax SLR introduced.
  • 1957 – First digital image produced on a computer by Russell Kirsch at U.S. National Bureau of Standards (now known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST). [2]
  • 1959 – Nikon F introduced.
  • 1959 – AGFA introduces the first fully automatic camera, the Optima.
  • 1963 – Kodak introduces the Instamatic.
  • 1964 – First Pentax Spotmatic SLR introduced.
  • 1973 – Fairchild Semiconductor releases the first large image forming CCD chip; 100 rows and 100 columns.
  • 1975 – Bryce Bayer of Kodak develops the Bayer filter mosaic pattern for CCD color image sensors.
  • 1986 – Kodak scientists invent the world's first megapixel sensor.
  • 2000 – J-SH04 introduced by J-Phone was first commercially available camera integrated with mobile phone, that can make and share still pictures.[3][4]
  • 2005 – AgfaPhoto files for bankruptcy. Production of Agfa brand consumer films ends.
  • 2006 – Dalsa produces 111 megapixel CCD sensor, the highest resolution at its time.
  • 2008 – Polaroid announces it is discontinuing the production of all instant film products, citing the rise of digital imaging technology.
  • 2009 – Kodak announces the discontinuance of Kodachrome film.[5]

See also

Notes

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External links

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "The First Photograph – Heliography". Retrieved 2009-09-29. from Helmut Gernsheim's article, "The 150th Anniversary of Photography," in History of Photography, Vol. I, No. 1, January 1977: ... In 1822, Niépce coated a glass plate ... The sunlight passing through ... This first permanent example ... was destroyed ... some years later. 
  2. [1]
  3. http://www.puremobile.com/cameraphones.asp
  4. http://www.physicswiki.net/Digital_camera#Integration
  5. http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jhtml?pq-path=2709&gpcid=0900688a80b4e692&ignoreLocale=true&pq-locale=en_US&_requestid=5434